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Beyond the medical crisis: The politics of Ebola in Sierra Leone

Written by Lisa Denney on 15 April, 2015 : 11:52


The international community has treated Ebola largely as a medical emergency, requiring a technical response. This is undoubtedly true in part, but it overlooks the political dimensions of the problem which will continue to resonate long after we have ‘gotten to zero’.

SLRC Sierra Leone research lead, Lisa Denney

While international attention on Sierra Leone is focused on the practical elements of tackling the Ebola epidemic, the political developments in the country have gone largely unnoticed and continue to unfold. In fact, this is symptomatic of the approach that the international community has taken to Ebola in that it has been treated largely as a medical emergency requiring a technical response. This is undoubtedly true in part, but it overlooks the inextricable political dimensions of the problem as the series of papers from the Institute of Development Studies on Ebola and Lessons for Development argues. These dimensions will continue to resonate long after we have ‘gotten to zero’ and risk being forgotten in the rush to respond.

Read the blog on the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) website: Beyond the medical crisis: The politics of Ebola in Sierra Leone

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Welcome to SLRC's blog.

This blog will feature reflections from our team of researchers on the practicalities of actually conducting research in conflict-affected situations. We will also be posting guest blogs written by key researchers and practioners working on livelihoods, basic services and social protection in conflict-affected situations.