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Was UK aid watchdog right to accuse DfID of failing to tackle corruption?

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12 November 2014
Was UK aid watchdog right to accuse DfID of failing to tackle corruption?

On Friday, the Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) published its new report: an assessment of the Department for International Development’s (DFID) anti-corruption programming. The findings aren’t great, in particular, the Commission notes that too little attention has been paid to the ‘everyday, small-scale but endemic corruption that includes bribery and favours, which most directly affects the lives of poor people’.

In this article, Richard Mallett offers his reflections on the report and explains why shifting the focus from the macro-level to how people live on a day-to-day basis can help us understand how livelihoods actually work, and concludes that often “corrupt” systems offer poor people a more viable means of getting by.

Read the article: Was UK aid watchdog right to accuse DfID of failing to tackle corruption?

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