Tracking change in livelihoods, service delivery and governance: evidence from a 2013-2015 panel survey in Uganda

Anastasia Marshak, Dyan Mazurana, Jimmy Hilton Opio, Rachel Gordon and Teddy Atim

Type: Working Paper

Country: Global

Date: 01/09/2017

Full summary

 

This working paper presents the findings from the SLRC sub-regional Uganda panel survey, conducted in 2013 and 2015 with the goal of producing information on household and respondent trajectories in relation to:

 

  • relationships with and perceptions of governance processes, practices and political actors;
  •  livelihoods and well-being (income-generating activities, asset portfolios, food security, constraining and enabling factors within the broader institutional and geographical context);
  • access to and satisfaction with basic services (education, health, water) and transfers (social protection and livelihood assistance).

 

The finding present a series of challenges to conventional thinking around livelihood recovery for war-affected populations. For example, the paper challenges the assumption that recovery of conflict-affected populations is a steady progression that can be influenced by national and international development and aid actors. Instead, the data shows great volatility in household recovery in northern Uganda. The latter section of this paper details the implications that these challenges have for donors, service deliverers and policy-makers working in Uganda.

 

While there is a relationship between service delivery and perceptions of government, it is far more complex than is frequently asserted. The analysis suggests that just providing these basic services is insufficient. It appears that what matters most where improvements are found in people’s perceptions of government actors are transparency and accountability regarding service quality and delivery, including participation in community meetings and decision-making. Thus, it is essential to invest in transparent and robust accountability mechanisms so that affected households and individuals can meaningfully participate in the delivery and quality of these essential services.

 

This working paper presents the findings from the SLRC sub-regional Uganda panel survey, conducted in 2013 and 2015 with the goal of producing information on household and respondent trajectories in relation to:

  • relationships with and perceptions of governance processes, practices and political actors;
  • livelihoods and well-being (income-generating activities, asset portfolios, food security, constraining and enabling factors within the broader institutional and geographical context);
  • access to and satisfaction with basic services (education, health, water) and transfers (social protection and livelihood assistance).

The finding present a series of challenges to conventional thinking around livelihood recovery for war-affected populations. For example, the paper challenges the assumption that recovery of conflict-affected populations is a steady progression that can be influenced by national and international development and aid actors. Instead, the data shows great volatility in household recovery in northern Uganda. The latter section of this paper details the implications that these challenges have for donors, service deliverers and policy-makers working in Uganda.

While there is a relationship between service delivery and perceptions of government, it is far more complex than is frequently asserted. The analysis suggests that just providing these basic services is insufficient. It appears that what matters most where improvements are found in people’s perceptions of government actors are transparency and accountability regarding service quality and delivery, including participation in community meetings and decision-making. Thus, it is essential to invest in transparent and robust accountabilit